Monthly Archives: March 2017

DEA Releases Legal Cannabis Import Data

The DEA today replied to our FOIA request for information on Legal Cannabis Seed imports into the US in the last 20 years.  While they weren’t able to supply some information as it was contained on a “retired” PC, they did supply information since 2010 and the numbers are amazing.

The clear trend has been a dramatic increase throughout the last 7 years.  It is assumed that this is Cannabis Seed that is being imported for hemp production but it will take further investigation to determine who is importing what.  Unfortunately the DEA doesn’t keep track of the difference between Cannabis Seed Imports and other forms of Cannabis.

The numbers are clear, yet muddied and we are seeking clarification but it appears that they are counting Grams in the report. (*EDIT 03-30-2017 – DEA confirms the weight unit is Grams** )

In 2010 it appears must be the year in which the switch was made from the old retired PC to the new system, so taking the low of 18,000 grams  (roughly 33 lbs) in 2011 and the high of almost 60 million grams (131,825 lbs) in 2016 the growth in imports is on a steady increase year over year.

The full FOIA can be found on our DEA FOIA page or this link 17-00256-F (DET)

 

DEA says Inhaled is Better

Today the DEA announced that they have a new FDA approved form of THC called Syndros.  Syndros is the result of work of Insys Therapeutics to create a new oral THC that has 5mg per ML of solution. – FEDERAL REGISTER LINK

In the DEA’s findings they are planning to schedule this as a Schedule II drug because.

Dronabinol is a generic name for the (-) delta-9-trans isomer of tetrahydrocannabinol (THC). THC is the primary psychoactive substance in marijuana. Dronabinol is the active pharmaceutical ingredient in Syndros. As stated by HHS, Marinol (synthetic dronabinol in sesame oil and encapsulated in a soft gelatin capsule) was approved by the FDA for medical use on May 31, 1985 and placed in schedule II based on its accepted medical use and high abuse potential. On July 2, 1999, Marinol was rescheduled from schedule II to schedule III because of the findings of the DEA that the difficulty of separating dronabinol from the sesame oil formulation and the delayed onset of behavioral effects due to oral route administration supported a lower abuse potential of Marinol as compared to substances in Schedule II. 64 FR 35928.

Going on to state:

HHS indicated that the formulation of Syndros (oral solution) is easier to abuse than Marinol because this liquid formulation can be manipulated to produce concentrated extracts of dronabinol for abuse by inhalation (smoking or vaping) or through other routes of administration. Because of the large amount of dronabinol in Syndros oral solution it has a greater potential for extraction than Marinol and thus has a greater abuse potential.

Based on the use of Cannabis by the general public DEA feels that this form of THC needs to be a Schedule II drug.

What you find when reading further down is that it appears DEA would rather people smoke it because of the onset of effects are easier to control.

Oral consumption of dronabinol, compared to inhaled THC, may result in psychoactive effects that are delayed and stronger with an increased risk of experiencing serious adverse events.

But then they quickly add:

When dronabinol (THC) is smoked, the drug rapidly reaches the brain and psychoactive effects are felt within minutes of inhalation, which allows the subject to control the dose more readily.

The DEA is full of contradictory things but this just about takes the cake.  Using a substance via oral methods pose issues that smoking or inhalation don’t and is better at controlling the dose.  However they are afraid that people will do just that.  Take this new drug and turn it into something they can control the dose better.

There is a time that this potential rule can be commented on, see the link at the top of the page to the federal register.

Congressional Research Service Report on Cannabis

On March 10th the Congressional Research Service released it’s report on “The Marijuana Policy Gap and the Path Forward”

“Given the current marijuana policy gap between the federal government and many of the states, there are a number of issues that Congress may address. These include, but are not limited to, issues surrounding availability of financial services for marijuana businesses, federal tax treatment, oversight of federal law enforcement, allowance of states to implement medical marijuana laws and involvement of federal health care workers, and consideration of marijuana as a Schedule I drug under the CSA. The marijuana policy gap has widened each year for some time. It has only been a few years since states began to legalize recreational marijuana, but over 20 years since they began to legalize medical marijuana. In addressing state – level legalization efforts and considering marijuana’s current placement on Schedule I, Congress could take one of several routes. It could elect to take no action, thereby upholding the federal government’s current marijuana policy. It may also decide that the CSA must be enforced in states and not allow them to implement conflicting laws on marijuana. Alternatively, Congress could choose to reevaluate marijuana’s placement as a Schedule I controlled substance.”

Here is the document – R44782

And a link to the CRS report