Monthly Archives: November 2016

WHO Pre-review Report Cannabis and Cannabis resin

With the upcoming meeting of the World Health Organization (WHO) Expert Committee on Drug Dependence Thirty-eight Meeting in Geneva, on 14 – 18 November 2016 many are calling for Cannabis to be an agenda item.

coverIn a pre-view Report “Cannabis and Cannabis Resin Pre-Review Report A document prepared for the World Health Organization” was prepared by H. Valerie Curran, Philip Wiffen, David J. Nutt, Willem Scholten.  In their report they give all the reasons why Cannabis should be more than an Update Item on the agenda.

In their report to the WHO they state in the preface:

In the eighty years since cannabis and cannabis resin were last reviewed by the Health Committee of the League of Nations in 1935, both the social context of cannabis use and the science of drug dependence have dramatically changed. Yet, cannabis and cannabis resin continue to remain under the strictest control regime possible under the Single Convention, without a valid scientific re-assessment of this decision. Cannabis and cannabis resin are listed in Schedule I and Schedule IV respectively, which means that both remain strictly prohibited worldwide.

then adding that the WHO is acting in a manner that appears to make continued prohibition illegitimate

The current scheduling of cannabis is in marked divergence with the Convention’s principle that scheduling of substances should be based on a scientific assessment by WHO. In the absence of a recent assessment, the continued prohibition of cannabis appears completely illegitimate even though it may be legal.

38ccdThey then proceed to ask the WHO to conduct a Scientific Review of cannabis and cannabis resin

A scientific review by the WHO, the only authoritative global body to make such an assessment, would greatly legitimize international policies and their national implementation. A scientific assessment of cannabis and cannabis resin appears most timely given the many debates that have emerged on this issue across the world in recent years.

In the fifty years since it’s inception the WHO has never conducted a scientific review of cannabis.  Despite it’s mandate to review the substance.

The scheduling under the Single Convention on Narcotic Drugs assumes a scientific justification. However, cannabis and cannabis resin have never been evaluated by WHO since it was mandated the review of psychoactive substances in 1948.

The purpose of the pre-review report is to clarify the position of the current state of use both medically and none medically.

The purpose of a Pre-review is to determine whether current information justifies a Critical Review. For evaluating substances in a Pre-review, the categories of information are identical to those used in Critical Reviews. At the stage of the Pre-review, the Expert Committee must decide whether the information justifies a Critical Review. If it finds that the data available may justify changing the scheduling of cannabis and/or cannabis resin, the Committee should recommend a Critical Review in its next Meeting.

The 53 page report, or 75 with cites, covers everything from adverse reactions, LD50 level, and pretty much everything you ever wanted to know about cannabis and how it works.  The report is remarkable in it’s completeness.

Conclusions Despite that the scheduling system of substances under the Single Convention on Narcotic Drugs is supposed to be based on scientific assessments, the WHO has never reviewed cannabis and cannabis resin. This means also that the Expert Committee continues to recommend that cannabis is not to be used medically despite growing evidence of considerable medical use world-wide, including the availability of a pharmaceutical preparation with a marketing authorization in multiple countries. Many countries are struggling with the impact of the prohibition of cannabis with its wide negative impact on societies (including through human rights violations) and on drug markets and drug use, including on the market of synthetic cannabinoids.

Committee recommendations are needed on the following topics:

1. Whether a Critical Review should be conducted for reviewing the current scheduling in Schedules I and IV. Each of the following reasons would justify a recommendation for a Critical Review: a. because WHO has never conducted a Critical Review, meaning that there is no scientific justification for the current scheduling; b. because the wide-spread medical use, including the use of preparations with a marketing authorization is in contradiction to listing in Schedule IV; c. because it is not clear whether the dependence-producing properties of cannabis and cannabis resin are between codeine and morphine (justification for Schedule I) or between dextropropoxyphene and codeine (justification for Schedule II) or below those of dextropropoxyphene (justification for not scheduling).

2. On the medical use of cannabis and its preparations (which can include revoking old recommendations by the Committee)

3. On the need of quality control on cannabis and cannabis products for medical and non-medical use.

Here is a link to the piece – LINK

Here is the report itself just in case it disappears from the net – whocannabisreport

Therapeutic Cannabinoid Research

Social Media and Cannabis

Everyone knows that you can follow all kinds of groups, organizations and such that are in favor of Cannabis but are you using social media to it’s full extent?  What about all those Representatives in Congress?  How about the FDA, Department of Justice, NIDA, NIH, and countless others?

It’s easy to follow them and depending on who they are they may send out lots of information or very little.  In any case it gives you an opportunity like we saw in a recent FDA post about Opiate addiction.

fda-faceHere the FDA is talking about the Surgeon General and the national Opiate Epidemic sweeping the United States.

This gives more than one person an opportunity to confront the FDA about the medical use of cannabis.  Present information that the use of opiates is down in states that have legalized cannabis.

Surprisingly the FDA responded to at least one of the comments with a link to their website.  Interestingly enough the information the FDA provides on it’s website link is both wrong and also opens new questions.

Are you using your use of Social media like Facebook to keep yourself informed and also have an opportunity to present information to the millions of people who also follow these groups?

Then there are your representatives both locally and federally.  All of them have Facebook Pages.  Follow them, look for opportunities to make intelligent comments that deal with Cannabis.  You would be surprised the number of opportunities you can have to not only educate your representatives but also those who are also following them.

This tactic also works great with Call in Radio programs, which is frankly where we got the idea.  Our founder used to call into one Talk Radio program so often he had his own theme music.  He looked for opportunities to be able to call into the program and turn the conversation to Cannabis.

fda-face2Social media gives you another opportunity to educate people about Cannabis.  Get out there and like pages of those who represent you and also the agencies that regulate you and get an opportunity to express your voice about Cannabis.

 

PTSD Clinical Trials Recruiting

clinicalEugene Applebaum College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences is currently recruiting patients for a Therapeutic Cannabinoid Research program for treatment of PTSD.

The goal of this study is to look at how a type of drug called cannabinoids are related to the processing of fear signals, the experience of emotions and fear, and the pattern of activity in the brain that is involved in these processes and how this relates to the development of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). PTSD is an anxiety disorder that occurs after experiencing a traumatic event(s) and is characterized by unwanted memories of the trauma(s) through flashbacks or nightmares, avoidance of situations that remind the person of the event, difficulty experiencing emotions, loss of interest in activities the person used to enjoy, and increased arousal, such as difficulty falling asleep or staying asleep, anger and hypervigilance. The information gained from this study could lead to the development of new treatments for persons who suffer from anxiety or fear-based disorders.
This study which has been waiting to start since Feb of 2014 is currently recruiting patients.  You can find more information on how you qualify, and who to contact at the following link.  This link takes you to ClinicalTrials.Gov a site not affiliated in any many with us.

Cannabinoid Control of Fear Extinction Neural Circuits in Post-traumatic Stress Disorder

Therapeutic Cannabinoid Research

 

Subterranean Marijuana Grow Room

In January of 2015 the DEA felt it necessary to issue a bulletin because of the discovery of an Underground Grow room.  In a FOIA request we wanted to see what they had to say and it wasn’t much.

dea-underground-growBasically they had discovered that someone had built a room under their home to grow cannabis covertly.  They warn about how this could “seriously compromise the integrity of the structure above.”

Apparently it was a pretty successful operation as they found about 100lbs of cannabis ready for distribution and 571 plants under cultivation.

For a copy of the Bulletin you can click here

Bulletin Medical Cannabis Cards Used as Decoy?

DEAAccording to a DEA document (DEA-DCT-BUL-064-15), released under the Freedom of Information Act, they have encountered “medical marijuana” card holders acting as decoys for shipments of cannabis across the border.

According to the bulletin they have had instances of people crossing the border who smelled of Cannabis who claimed Medical Marijuana use.  In the 2 instances cited the people had the smell of marijuana on them that have showed their state issued medical cannabis cards.  In one instance they found a single gram which they confiscated, and in both instances they allowed the persons entry into the country without any charges.

What they fear, but have no documentation it has occurred, is that someone will keep the agents busy while a big load comes across the border.  So as a warning to the agency they are expressing that this could be used as a tactic to bring cannabis into the country.

What a joke the document which was created in 2015 is.